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Chicago 10

review by Zach B.

 

 

MPAA Rating: R (For Language and Brief Sexual Images)

Running Time: 99 Minutes

Starring the voices of: Hank Azaria, Dylan Baker, Nick Nolte, Mark Ruffalo, Roy Scheider, Liev Schrieber, Jeffrey Wright

Written and Directed by: Brett Morgen

 

Studio: Paramount

Retail Price: $29.99

Features: Chicago 10 Remix Video by Gina Telaroli

Specs: 1.85:1 Anamorphic Widescreen, English Dolby Digital 5.1, English Subtitles, English Closed Captions, Scene Index (16 Scenes)

Released: August 19th, 2008


 

 

"Chicago 10" is presented in 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen. I suppose the best way to judge the merits of this transfer is by the computer animated sequences, as the other parts of the movie consists of archival footage that's blown up and a bit grainy (and certainly watchable). The computer animated parts are strong in detail, and rich in color saturation that pops off the screen. Still, it might be a little much - and contrast is a bit too high in these parts, as the skin colors of the characters look way too white. Throughout the transfer, I noticed instances of shimmering and noise, plus small blemishes. It's a bit of a tricky transfer to judge, but all things considering, I think the picture quality is pretty pleasing.


 

The only audio option for "Chicago 10" is an English Dolby Digital 5.1 track. It's a fine mix that gives off a simple and snug presence. Dialogue is crisp and always to hear, but there isn't too much in way of surrounds. What elevates this track is the musical score from Jeff Danna, which is creatively mixed through the channels and often does surround you. Dynamic range is decent and subwoofer use isn't much, but fidelity is pretty high. For what this movie is, this mix satisfies.

English subtitles and English closed captions from your TV are available. 
 




I would have loved to have heard from writer/director Brett Morgen in some capacity about why he made this film, and why he did it in this manner, but no such luck. The only extra is a Video Remix by Gina Telaroli (spelled "Gine" on the DVD package), who apparently won a contest. It's well put-together, and captures the spirit of the uneasy times of 1968.

 

"Chicago 10" might be a bit uneven, but it's still a refreshingly unique documentary that casts an informative light over the events surrounding the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The DVD doesn't offer much, but the movie's presentation is above average. Fans of 1960s history and of politics should find this to be a worthy rental.